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CarpeLibrum

Carpe Librum

Reviews and bookish conversation with author Samantha Wilcoxson.

If I am lost, you will find me in medieval England.

You can also find me - and my books - on my blog.

Historical Novel Society

Currently reading

A Column of Fire
Ken Follett
Crusader
Paul Bannister
The Naked Public Square: Religion and Democracy in America
Richard John Neuhaus
A Year with Dietrich Bonhoeffer
Carla Barnhill, Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Jim Wallis

New Release! Once a Queen

myBook.to/OnceAQueen

Source: http://myBook.to/OnceAQueen

Tudor Persecution of Carthusian Monks

'On February 1, 1535, King Henry VIII's Act of Supremacy came into force, and one of the first groups he proceeded against were the Carthusian monks. Although this order had long been a respected and peaceful group, Henry labeling himself 'Supreme Head on Earth of the Church of England' made it possible for him to charge them with treason for their failure to accept his self-proclaimed level of spiritual power. His retribution was fierce and intended to be an example of any who considered refusing to take the Oath of Supremacy.'

 

(Continue Reading)

 

Source: http://samanthawilcoxson.blogspot.com/2018/02/tudor-persecution-of-carthusian-monks.html

The Husbands of Margaret Beaufort

A big THANK YOU to Tudor Times for inviting me to talk about Margaret Beaufort and her four husbands!

 

http://tudortimes.co.uk/guest-articles/the-husbands-of-margaret-beaufort

 

Source: http://tudortimes.co.uk/guest-articles/the-husbands-of-margaret-beaufort

As Bright as Heaven by Susan Meissner

As Bright as Heaven - Susan Meissner

As Bright as Heaven is a novel that feels like a friend by the time one finishes it. The storytellers, a mother and her three daughters, each add their own perspective and emotion to the events of 1918: World War I and the Spanish flu on a global level, love and loss on a personal level. I was captivated from the beginning and sad when it ended.

The method of telling each chapter from the perspective of one of the women/girls of the Bright family reminded me of The Poisonwood Bible. Both books include families moved from all that is familiar with faith and expectations packed in their luggage. This book is not as academically written and does not make such an obvious political statement, but it also feels more real. The faith of the Bright family is ever-present but not overbearing. They struggle, make mistakes, love, forgive, and lose precious loved ones in the flu epidemic that stole more from the world than the war did.

If some of the plot twist in this novel was predictable, I think the author can be forgiven. The development of the Bright girls' characters as they grew up and the emotions elicited throughout the novel more than make up for the lack of mystery. The spotlight on the impact of the flu in Philadelphia and the setting of an undertaker business are brilliant choices that make this an original and inspirational story.

I received this book through NetGalley. Opinions are my own.

Not exactly a review

Conspirata - Robert Harris Imperium - Robert Harris

I loved listening to these two books! Therefore, I am incredibly disappointed to see that Hoopla does not have the third in audio. I will definitely have to check other sources - and get them all in paper format to read again. Great stuff! 

 

Funny thing, I only started reading these because I am writing about Reginald Pole and he made his own annotated book of the writings of Cicero, so I thought I should get an idea of what Cicero was like. If these novels are any indication, I like him just as much as good old Reggie did.

Life of Reginald Pole - Martin Haile
"Believe as firmly as if your salvation depended on faith alone; act as if good works were all sufficient."

Anne Boleyn's apology to Princess Mary

Yes, really!

 

https://samanthawilcoxson.blogspot.com/2018/01/anne-boleyns-apology-to-princess-mary.html

 

Source: http://samanthawilcoxson.blogspot.com/2018/01/anne-boleyns-apology-to-princess-mary.html

Life in the time of Mary I

I am a guest of Mary Anne Yarde today with a look at life during the mid-16th century. Mary's day was much different than that of those she reigned over!

 

Source: http://maryanneyarde.blogspot.co.uk/2018/01/life-in-time-of-queen-mary-i-by.html

Reginald Pole and the Papal Conclave of 1550

Did you know that Reginald almost became pope?

 

https://samanthawilcoxson.blogspot.com/2018/01/reginald-pole-and-papal-conclave-of-1550.html

 

Source: http://samanthawilcoxson.blogspot.com/2018/01/reginald-pole-and-papal-conclave-of-1550.html

Tudor Book of Days by Tudor Times

Tudor Book of Days - Tudor Times

The Tudor Book of Days is a more lovely and useful book than I had anticipated. Set up as a perpetual calendar, it can be used for multiple years with notes about special days accumulating through time. It comes fully stocked with Feast and Saints days that would have been an important component in the Tudor era Books of Hours that were prized possessions of their day. Each day also includes a notable event of the Tudor era, providing one with a link to the past to begin every day.

 

Besides all of this, an index is included which provides a summary of each person mentioned in the daily facts. Therefore it is easy to learn more if the notable person or event of the day is one that is unfamiliar to the user, and the book becomes much more than a simple daily diary.

 

This book is an example of the high quality standard I would expect of Tudor Times. A sturdy yet beautiful hardcover and thick pages make this a perpetual diary that will last for years to come. It is so lovely that I was at first hesitant to write in it!

 

I look forward to making use of this book to track important historic dates and organize my blogging schedule with relevant information. I have attempted to develop something like this diary on my own with mediocre results, so I am especially thrilled to have the Tudor Book of Days as an addition to my desk that is both useful and attractive.

A Hobbit, a Wardrobe, and a Great War

This looks like something to look forward to!

The Fate of Kings

Mark Stibbe is a guest on my blog today, announcing his new release The Fate of Kings and discussing the relevance of late 18th century politics to modern times. 

 

Source: http://samanthawilcoxson.blogspot.com/2017/12/the-fate-of-kings-and-its-relevance-to.html

Interview at The Writing Desk

Tony Riches has interviewed me for his blog today. Check it out.  :-)

Source: http://tonyriches.blogspot.co.uk/2017/12/special-guest-interview-with-author_5.html

12 Days of Christmas Tudor Book Giveaway

 

I am honored to be part of the 12 Days of Christmas Tudor Book Giveaway at On the Tudor Trail! Check it out for a chance to win a copy of Queen of Martyrs, and make sure you sign up for the many other fabulous books as well.

Source: http://onthetudortrail.com/Blog/2017/12/04/on-the-fourth-day-of-christmas-book-2

The House of Beaufort by Nathen Amin

House of Beaufort: The Bastard Line that Captured the Crown - Nathen Amin
This book is a must-read for anyone interested in the late Plantagenet era. The Beauforts are a family that hovers around the edges of royalty for a century before they seemingly disappear . . . . except that the last Beaufort, by blood if not by name, is on the throne. 

Amin unravels the complicated family ties of the Beauforts, creating clarity for anyone who has wondered how this 'bastard line' managed to hold such incredible power. By the time of the Wars of the Roses, the Beaufort family had spread and married into enough noble lines that there were truly those with Beaufort blood on both sides, including Edward IV himself through his mother, Cecily Neville. Somehow, the author manages to explain all these interwoven relationships without making the reader's head spin. For that alone, this book deserves every one of those 5 stars.

I appreciated that this was a balanced look at each person included. Yes, the focus is the Beauforts, but their weaknesses and mistakes are covered just as thoroughly as their strengths and triumphs. Unlike some modern non-fiction, I do not feel a need to label this as a narrative leaning in any particular direction or favoring a certain point-of-view. It is simply a comprehensive and understandable record of the Beaufort family from its birth, through a tumultuous and stunning rise, until its tragic end. (Unless you count Henry Tudor as a Beaufort, then they claim the ultimate victory.)

This book is the brilliant result of tireless research and a passion to reveal the truth about a family that is always mentioned on the periphery of historical events without often managing to be the focus. The Beauforts deserved this book, and it will help clarify the family's role to anyone who has only encountered them through historical fiction. 

I received an electronic copy of this book from the author for review purposes, but I will be purchasing it in hardcover because I see it being a source that I will wish to reference again and again.

Socrates in the City by Eric Metaxas

Socrates in the City: Conversations on "Life, God, and Other Small Topics" - Eric Metaxas

A series of talks on 'life, God, and other small topics,' this book is the thinking person's alternative to pop psychology and prosperity gospel (that will seem much more clever and applicable if you listen to the book).

 

Based upon other reviews, I can see that listening to the audio version of this book is much more enjoyable than reading the paperback. That makes sense, since the audiobook is a recording of the Socrates in the City events with different lecturers taking on a variety of topics before opening up the session to Q&A.

 

Listening to this made me think and added several new books to my TBR. Definitely worth a listen.